Nutrition

More consumers are becoming aware of the relationship between a well-balanced diet and good health. They want to eat smart, without sacrificing the pleasure of eating well. Consumers are demanding satisfying, nutrition-wise menu choices; lean meats, including veal, fulfill those requirements. A staple of a well-balanced diet, lean meat fits within the Dietary Guidelines recommended by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), American Heart Association (AHA) and The American Dietetic Association (ADA). Lean meat is a sound choice when featured as the main entrée or used to increase the nutritional profile and taste of items such as salads, soups and pasta dishes. Veal compares favorably with poultry, fish, seafood and lean cuts of beef, pork and lamb.

Nutrients in Veal

Veal is a complete, nutrient dense food that provides high percentages of essential vitamins and minerals. The chart below is a profile of veal’s nutrient content for a 3 oz., cooked, trimmed serving. Percentages of the recommended dietary intake are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

Veal vs. Other Center-of-the-Plate Proteins

Veal is a sound choice when featured center-of-the plate or used to increase the nutritional profile and taste of menu items such as salads, soups and pasta dishes. A veal leg cutlet has only 128 calories and compares very favorably to a skinless chicken breast (142 Kcal), a beef eye round (143 Kcal) and pork tenderloin (139 Kcal). The same veal cutlet has only 3g of fat, compared to 4.1g for pork tenderloin, 4.2g of beef eye round and 3.1g for skinless chicken breast.

Center of the Plate Comparison
(All values are based on 3 oz. cooked, trimmed, edible portion.)

Veal

Calories (Kcal)

Total Fat (g)

Saturated Fat (g)

Cholesterol (mg)

Cutlet, leg, roasted

128

3.0

1.0

88

Loin, roasted

149

6.0

2.2

90

Rib, roasted

150

6.3

1.8

98

Breast, whole, boneless, braised

185

8.3

3.2

99

Shank (fore and hind), braised

150

3.7

1.0

107

Chicken

Calories (Kcal)

Total Fat (g)

Saturated Fat (g)

Cholesterol (mg)

Breast (broilers or fryers), meat only, roasted

142

3.1

.9

73

Thigh (broilers or fryers), meat only, roasted

178

9.2

2.6

81

Turkey

Calories (Kcal)

Total Fat (g)

Saturated Fat (g)

Cholesterol (mg)

Turkey, all classes, light meat, roasted

133

2.7

0.9

59

Fish

Calories (Kcal)

Total Fat (g)

Saturated Fat (g)

Cholesterol (mg)

Salmon, sockeye, dry heat

184

9.3

1.6

74

Swordfish, dry heat

132

4.4

1.2

43

Shrimp, mixed species, moist heat

84

0.9

0.2

166

Lobster, Northern, moist heat

83

0.5

0.1

61

Beef

Calories (Kcal)

Total Fat (g)

Saturated Fat (g)

Cholesterol (mg)

Eye round, trimmed to 1/4″ fat, all grades, roasted

143

4.2

1.5

59

Top Sirloin, trimmed to 1/4″ fat, all grades, broiled

166

6.1

2.4

76

Tenderloin, trimmed to 1/4″ fat, all grades, broiled

179

8.5

3.2

71

Pork

Calories (Kcal)

Total Fat (g)

Saturated Fat (g)

Cholesterol (mg)

Tenderloin, roasted

139

4.1

1.4

67

Rib Chop, loin, center rib (chop), bone-in, broiled

186

8.3

2.9

69

Lamb

Calories (Kcal)

Total Fat (g)

Saturated Fat (g)

Cholesterol (mg)

Shank, leg, half, trimmed to 1/4″ fat, choice grade, roasted

153

5.7

2.0

74

Rack (rib), trimmed 1/4″ fat, choice grade, roasted

197

11.3

4.0

75

SOURCE: USDA Nutrient Data Laboratory (NDL)/NDL Bulletin Board